Friday, October 20, 2017

Michigan's namesake ship arrives in South Korea

USS Michigan arrives in South Korea/Photo courtesy of the US Navy
The Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Michigan arrived at Busan, South Korea on October 13 for a routine visit during a regularly scheduled deployment to the Western Pacific. During the visit Sailors will experience the culture and history of the Republic of Korea (ROK), as well as foster outstanding relations between the U.S. Navy, ROK military and the local Busan community.

“The U.S. and ROK navies have always enjoyed a strong relationship. Today, our relationship is stronger than it has ever been and our ironclad partnership is further reinforced by this visit from Michigan," said Rear Adm. Brad Cooper, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea. “Michigan Sailors were warmly welcomed by the ROK Navy today and I know they’ll receive the same wonderful welcome from the local community during their visit to Busan."

USS Michigan is one of four Ohio-class guided-missile submarines.  The Navy’s guided-missile submarines provide the Navy with unprecedented strike and special operation mission capabilities from a stealthy, clandestine platform. Armed with tactical missiles and equipped with superior communications capabilities, guided-missile submarines are capable of launching missile strikes and supporting Special Operation Forces missions.

 “Throughout this deployment, the crew has been extremely professional and dedicated,” said Capt. Gustavo Gutierrez, Michigan’s commanding officer. “Everyone on board is mission ready, and I’m proud of being their commanding officer.”

Measuring more than 560 feet long and weighing more than 18,000 tons when submerged, Michigan is one of the largest submarines in the world.

“We are looking forward to working with our [Republic of Korea Navy] partners and experiencing the Korean culture, which is a first for many of us,” said Gutierrez.

Michigan is the second submarine of the Ohio-class of ballistic missile submarines and guided missile submarines, and the third U.S. Navy Michigan to bear the name. Michigan is homeported in Bremerton, Washington and is forward deployed from Guam.

Editor's note: This post is a part of this blog's semi-regular Friday Focus series, which endeavors to highlight news and opinions that, in my opinion, don't get as much attention as they deserve.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Rollover accident on Southfield Freeway

Rollover accident on Southfield Fwy. - Photo by Frank Nemecek
There has been a rollover accident on the northbound Southfield Freeway between Paul and W. Warren Ave. Police, firefighters, and an ambulance are on the scene.

Traffic in the area is at a virtual standstill. Motorists are advised to avoid the area, if possible.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Power outage in Warrendale

Screen grab from DTE Energy showing the areas without power
According to DTE Energy, 882 households in the Warrendale neighborhood are currently without power. These outages are happening in the area south of Whitlock and west of the Southfield Freeway in Detroit.

Crews are currently working to restore power. However, the utility does not have an estimate currently available as to when power will be restored throughout the neighborhood.

Friday, September 29, 2017

Southfield woman walks to save lives

When Patty Castelli of Southfield, Michigan became ill in 2013, she had a feeling something was seriously wrong. What she didn’t know was that the simple chest x-ray she insisted on would end up saving her life.

“I was lucky,” Patty says, “I was lucky that I chose to have that scan, and I was lucky that the dark spot on my lung showed up.” After more testing and a biopsy, it was confirmed that Patty had lung cancer. “Most of all I was lucky that we caught it early.” Shortly after the detection, Patty underwent robotic surgery to remove the tumor from her lower left lobe. “I am still doing fine four years later.”

But not everyone is as lucky as Patty. As the #1 cancer killer, lung cancer takes the lives of more women than any other cancer. Yet, according to the American Lung Association's 3rd annual Women's Lung Health Barometer — a survey of over 1,000 American adult women that measures their awareness, knowledge, and perceptions about lung cancer — 98 percent of women do not have lung cancer on their health radar. Awareness is critical because if lung cancer is caught before it spreads, like in Patty’s case, the likelihood of survival more than triples.

That’s why Patty has made it her mission to partner with the American Lung Association to help spread awareness and save lives.  In April, she was selected to represent the state of Michigan to meet with Congress in Washington, D.C. to personally advocate for lung cancer research. “This was one of the proudest moments of my life,” she remembers. “I was representing more than just myself and my own struggles. We are a force to be reckoned with, and we can make a difference!”

Patty will be continuing her mission this Sunday, October 1 at the LUNG FORCE Walk at the Detroit Zoo. The event features LUNG FORCE Heroes and their families, a LUNG FORCE Action Passport to interactive education areas, fun games and activities, and inspiring stories of hope. Funds raised support research, advocacy, and educational programs. Learn more and register at lungforce.org or call the American Lung Association at (248) 784-2000.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

WCO to meet on Monday


The next general membership meeting of the Warrendale Community Organization will be this coming Monday, October 2. The meeting will be in the Activities Building of Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic Church (7685 Grandville Ave.). It will start at 7 pm and is expected to last until 8 p.m.

This meeting will include a guest speaker from DTE Energy in Detroit.

Everyone in the Warrendale neighborhood is welcome to attend.

Monday, September 25, 2017

Keeping contaminants out of Detroit's recycling


To increase recycling rates, the City of Detroit created a single-stream recycling system a few years ago. They thought it would be easy. However, over the last five years, the value of recovered waste has plummeted while the effort to extract it has risen. One of the major challenges in single-stream recycling is contamination.

Contaminants - or those dirty, rotten scoundrels - are what happens when non-recyclable items are mixed with recyclables. Innocent papers smeared with food or grease, paper towels, paper plates, napkins, the dreaded Styrofoam - these are some of the reasons that tons of recyclables are rejected from Detroit's recycling system each year.

There’s a general rule of thumb we use to help those who are not sure if something is recyclable or not recyclable: When in Doubt, Throw it Out.

Contaminants pickup by season too. In the spring there will be garden hoses and plant containers. During the holidays, there will be broken Christmas lights and foil wrapping paper. So let’s take a look at the top three most common contaminants found in recycling today. Keep in mind that every community is different and some accept things curbside where others do not so check with your municipality for a current list of what can be recycled. For the most part, here are the top three things that material recovery facilities do not like:

Plastic Grocery Bags.  Number one thing facilities pull out during hand sorting. These bags can muck up the machinery and close it down. Grocery Bags can be taken back to your local grocer to be disposed of properly.

Speaking of plastic grocery bags: do not put recyclables in them and then into your cart. These would be automatically pulled and sent to a landfill. Workers should never open plastic bags to sort through recycling due to safety reasons.

Pizza Boxes. Some municipalities will allow these to be picked up curbside if you take the insert out and throw it away, but the truth of the matter is that a pizza box can ruin an entire batch of slurry. The delicious cheese that we love on our pizzas is greasy. That grease permeates the cardboard. Cardboard is mixed with water and squeeze-pressed to make new paper and that grease will cause holes in paper.

It’s really that simple. Oil and water do not mix and the facility will generally pull pizza boxes out during hand sorting.

Styrofoam. Expanded polystyrene, more commonly known as Styrofoam, is problematic to recycle. The problem is the weight. The exact reason that makes Styrofoam so attractive to be used in packaging is the same reason it is difficult to recycle.

Profits from recycling are calculated per pound. With material so lightweight, it takes more money to cover the cost of transportation, handling, and processing. To process it so that it is cost efficient requires costly equipment. While it can be recycled, it isn’t accepted curbside because it is not cost effective to do so. Your best bet is to avoid Styrofoam when possible.

Other contaminants include food, trash, hardcover books, light bulbs, electronics, cookware (ceramics, plates, cups), window/mirror glass and construction debris.

These tips are brought to you by the Warrendale (Detroit) Blog as part of our Tip of the Week feature. Please check back next week for more advice for your home, money, and life.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Discount on Educator.com subscription


Every parent wants their child to do well in school and getting a discount in the process is even better. When a student isn't able to live up to the full potential in the classroom, services like Educator.com can help a student succeed.
For those not familiar with the service, Educator.com is a startup e-learning site focused on delivering the highest quality educational content created by great teachers. The Educator experience is designed to provide you with everything you need to succeed in your high school and university level courses.
Their site creates a one-to-one learning environment with the instructor; emphasizing graphical explanations and working through solution steps. Their goal is to make learning accessible, affordable, and fun for every student. Plus, they have a special discount for readers of this blog that I'll explain in a moment.
First, I want to tell you a little more about Educator.com and some of the things that I like about it. I really like the fact that there are multiple examples worked out and explained in each lecture as well as:
  • Under each lecture video are comprehensive notes that detail things to remember and common student mistakes. It is the perfect tool to refresh your memory before a big test without having to watch the entire lecture again;
  • Taught by the most effective college professors;
  • All of their instructors have doctorate degrees and are current university professors. Several have more than 25 years of teaching experience; and
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With all of these benefits, I'm pleased to an exclusive 10% discount for any of their courses for readers of the Warrendale (Detroit) Blog. All of these courses include a free introductory lesson.
To get this 10% off discount on a six-month or annual subscription, readers should enter the coupon code 399840D0EF at checkout.
This discount is brought to you by the Warrendale (Detroit) Blog as part of our Tip of the Week feature. Please check back next week for more advice for your home, money, and life.